Trillium Pathway Phase 3 – photos

Detour towards the fence!
Detour towards the fence or walk your bike around the fence.

The Trillium pathway is finally finished. The third stage was landscaped and finished in September/October 2018 (project OTT-046) and completes a wonderful and safe cycling loop along the canal, the Trillium railway tracks and the Ottawa River. A cycling tourist’s dream.

The old situation as captured by Mr One Wheel Drive on Mapillary
The old situation as captured by Mr One Wheel Drive on Mapillary. Whoever dumped that load of crushed stone there……

No refuge

The original project envisioned crossing Prince of Wales via a refuge. I like refuges very much because unlike at a traffic light, you don’t have to wait in the middle of the night for traffic that isn’t there.

Back in the Netherlands in the 1980’s, many lights were switched to amber after a certain hour (perhaps 10 pm), so you can just roll through the intersection and keep your eyes open. But that is a concept that has not arrived here and fear for litigation makes me think it will never happen.

Quote
Two courtesy crossings of Prince of Wales Drive with central median refuge will facilitate connections along pedestrian and cyclist desire lines while eliminating the need for cyclist dismounts. These crossings will not be signalized. (Spring 2017)
Unquote

The original plan was downsized to just a path towards PoW and then to the intersection at Dow’s Lake. A total of 300 meters. I don’t think that was the best solution but it is what it is. Note that none of the bike infrastructure on the south side was implemented.

Budget

The project map after the modifications (source: City of Ottawa)
The project map after the modifications (source: City of Ottawa)

The budget for the pathway was $275,000 or around $900 per meter. By comparison, the Laurier bike lane project was in 2011 -if I remember correctly- about $700,000 for 1.3 km or around $540 dollars per meter.

Safety issues

The path is maintained in winter, and provides residents with a great route to bypass Preston St. Unfortunately it doesn’t connect well for cycle traffic approaching from the south. Most of the time I cut across at the bottom of the hill to get to the trail head; the one time I actually tried to do a proper left turn and waited in the EB PoW bike lane, a driver veered into the bike lane and nearly hit me from behind. There is no safe place to wait for traffic to pass basically.

Some construction photos

But this is not a blog post about a complaint, I just want to show how incredibly basic the construction of a multi use pathway is. We should roll out as much as possible during the start of this term of council and enjoy it. To set the stage, here are the photos of the construction.

Digging out the old crushed stone and stone dust
Digging out the old crushed stone and stone dust
New layer of crushed stone
New layer of crushed stone
Detour towards the fence!
Detour towards the fence (?) or walk your bike around the fence
A thin layer of asphalt.
A thin layer of asphalt….and done! The desire line on the left is also still being used I noticed recently
The stretch along Prince of Wales is converted from a sidewalk to a multi use pathway
The stretch along Prince of Wales is converted from a sidewalk into a multi use pathway
Curbs are made by hand. In other countries you often see precast concrete curbs
Curbs are still made by hand
Voila, the curb is in
Voila, two days later the curb is in

I would have loved to see the MUP stay at its raised sidewalk level when crossing the entrance to the parking lot. This would have slowed down traffic turning into the parking lot. But alas, we are not there yet. We will see at next year’s tulip festival how this is going to work out. I expect a number of tweets.

Landscaping: new sods are put in along the edges
Landscaping: new sods are put in along the edges
The last bit of asphalt is in. The road barrel in the back is likely a victim of the tornado that struck Ottawa a few days earlier on November 21.
The last bit of asphalt is in
The route long Prince of Wales continues on the road surface over the bridge towards the roundabout by means of a curb cut.
The route along Prince of Wales continues on the road surface over the bridge towards the roundabout by means of a curb cut. The right turn lane has been removed and replaced by a curb site bike lane

In the photo above you can see the curb cut between two cast iron Tactile Walking Surface Indicator (TWSI). If you ever go to a road redesign open house, ask about the ‘Twizzies’, which is the more popular acronym for those rusty iron knobbed sheets of iron. It will make you sound like a true expert and they might listen to you.

The left hand Twizzy is a bit of a mystery to me. The only reason to cross there is to go to the curling rink of the Navy Curling club; there are safer ways then cross PoW at the bottom of a hill without a cross walk. But perhaps there is more to come?

What better place to dump snow than at the end of the pathway at the curb cut. And then complain about cyclists on the side walk
What better place to dump snow than at the end of the pathway on the curb cut. And then receiving complaints about cyclists on the side walk. The snow is now stored in the bike lane.

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